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Title: Unconventional route to dual-shelled organolead halide perovskite nanocrystals with controlled dimensions, surface chemistry, and stabilities
The past few years have witnessed rapid advances in the synthesis of high-quality perovskite nanocrystals (PNCs). However, despite the impressive developments, the stability of PNCs remains a substantial challenge. The ability to reliably improve stability of PNCs while retaining their individual nanometer size represents a critical step that underpins future advances in optoelectronic applications. Here, we report an unconventional strategy for crafting dual-shelled PNCs (i.e., polymer-ligated perovskite/SiO 2 core/shell NCs) with exquisite control over dimensions, surface chemistry, and stabilities. In stark contrast to conventional methods, our strategy relies on capitalizing on judiciously designed star-like copolymers as nanoreactors to render the growth of core/shell NCs with controlled yet tunable perovskite core diameter, SiO 2 shell thickness, and surface chemistry. Consequently, the resulting polymer-tethered perovskite/SiO 2 core/shell NCs display concurrently a stellar set of substantially improved stabilities (i.e., colloidal stability, chemical composition stability, photostability, water stability), while having appealing solution processability, which are unattainable by conventional methods.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1914713 1727313 1803495
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10142682
Journal Name:
Science Advances
Volume:
5
Issue:
11
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
eaax4424
ISSN:
2375-2548
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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