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Title: Parent–Adolescent Acculturation Profiles and Adolescent Language Brokering Experiences in Mexican Immigrant Families
Award ID(s):
1651128
NSF-PAR ID:
10149673
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of Youth and Adolescence
Volume:
49
Issue:
1
ISSN:
0047-2891
Page Range / eLocation ID:
335 to 351
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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