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Title: Exploration of stem endophytic communities revealed developmental stage as one of the drivers of fungal endophytic community assemblages in two Amazonian hardwood genera
Abstract

Many aspects of the dynamics of tropical fungal endophyte communities are poorly known, including the influence of host taxonomy, host life stage, host defence, and host geographical distance on community assembly and composition. Recent fungal endophyte research has focused onHevea brasiliensisdue to its global importance as the main source of natural rubber. However, almost no data exist on the fungal community harboured within otherHeveaspecies or its sister genusMicrandra. In this study, we expanded sampling to include four additionalHeveaspp. and twoMicrandraspp., as well as two host developmental stages. Through culture-dependent and -independent (metagenomic) approaches, a total of 381 seedlings and 144 adults distributed across three remote areas within the Peruvian Amazon were sampled. Results from both sampling methodologies indicate that host developmental stage had a greater influence in community assemblage than host taxonomy or locality. Based on FunGuild ecological guild assignments, saprotrophic and mycotrophic endophytes were more frequent in adults, while plant pathogens were dominant in seedlings.Trichodermawas the most abundant genus recovered from adult trees whileDiaportheprevailed in seedlings. Potential explanations for that disparity of abundance are discussed in relation to plant physiological traits and community ecology hypotheses.

 
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NSF-PAR ID:
10153528
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Nature Publishing Group
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Scientific Reports
Volume:
9
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2045-2322
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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