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Title: A multi-species repository of social networks
Abstract

Social network analysis is an invaluable tool to understand the patterns, evolution, and consequences of sociality. Comparative studies over a range of social systems across multiple taxonomic groups are particularly valuable. Such studies however require quantitative social association or interaction data across multiple species which is not easily available. We introduce the Animal Social Network Repository (ASNR) as the first multi-taxonomic repository that collates 790 social networks from more than 45 species, including those of mammals, reptiles, fish, birds, and insects. The repository was created by consolidating social network datasets from the literature on wild and captive animals into a consistent and easy-to-use network data format. The repository is archived athttps://bansallab.github.io/asnr/. ASNR has tremendous research potential, including testing hypotheses in the fields of animal ecology, social behavior, epidemiology and evolutionary biology.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10153723
Journal Name:
Scientific Data
Volume:
6
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2052-4463
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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