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Title: Quantitative firing pattern phenotyping of hippocampal neuron types
Abstract

Systematically organizing the anatomical, molecular, and physiological properties of cortical neurons is important for understanding their computational functions. Hippocampome.org defines 122 neuron types in the rodent hippocampal formation based on their somatic, axonal, and dendritic locations, putative excitatory/inhibitory outputs, molecular marker expression, and biophysical properties. We augmented the electrophysiological data of this knowledge base by collecting, quantifying, and analyzing the firing responses to depolarizing current injections for every hippocampal neuron type from published experiments. We designed and implemented objective protocols to classify firing patterns based on 5 transients (delay, adapting spiking, rapidly adapting spiking, transient stuttering, and transient slow-wave bursting) and 4 steady states (non-adapting spiking, persistent stuttering, persistent slow-wave bursting, and silence). This automated approach revealed 9 unique (plus one spurious) families of firing pattern phenotypes while distinguishing potential new neuronal subtypes. Novel statistical associations emerged between firing responses and other electrophysiological properties, morphological features, and molecular marker expression. The firing pattern parameters, experimental conditions, spike times, references to the original empirical evidences, and analysis scripts are released open-source through Hippocampome.org for all neuron types, greatly enhancing the existing search and browse capabilities. This information, collated online in human- and machine-accessible form, will help design and interpret both more » experiments and model simulations.

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Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10153869
Journal Name:
Scientific Reports
Volume:
9
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2045-2322
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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