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Title: Vibronic coherence evolution in multidimensional ultrafast photochemical processes
Abstract

The complex choreography of electronic, vibrational, and vibronic couplings used by photoexcited molecules to transfer energy efficiently is remarkable, but an unambiguous description of the temporally evolving vibronic states governing these processes has proven experimentally elusive. We use multidimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy to identify specific time-dependent excited state vibronic couplings involving multiple electronic states, high-frequency vibrations, and low-frequency vibrations which participate in ultrafast intersystem crossing and subsequent relaxation of a photoexcited transition metal complex. We discover an excited state vibronic mechanism driving long-lived charge separation consisting of an initial electronically-localized vibrational wavepacket which triggers delocalization onto two charge transfer states after propagating for ~600 femtoseconds. Electronic delocalization consequently occurs through nonadiabatic internal conversion driven by a 50 cm−1coupling resulting in vibronic coherence transfer lasting for ~1 picosecond. This study showcases the power of multidimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy to elucidate complex, non-equilibrium energy and charge transfer mechanisms involving multiple molecular coordinates.

Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1565759
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10154256
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Volume:
10
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2041-1723
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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