skip to main content

Attention:

The NSF Public Access Repository (NSF-PAR) system and access will be unavailable from 5:00 PM ET until 11:00 PM ET on Friday, June 21 due to maintenance. We apologize for the inconvenience.


Title: The End-to-End Provenance Project
Award ID(s):
1832210
NSF-PAR ID:
10154583
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Patterns
Volume:
1
Issue:
2
ISSN:
2666-3899
Page Range / eLocation ID:
100016
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
More Like this
  1. Advanced FinFET SRAMs undergo reliability degradation due to various front-end and back-end wearout mechanisms. The design of reliable SRAMs benefits from accurate wearout models that are calibrated by accelerated test. With respect to testing, the accelerated conditions which can help separate the dominant wearout mechanisms related to circuit failure is crucial for model calibration and reliability prediction. In this paper, the estimation of optimal accelerated test regions for a 14nm FinFET SRAM under various wearout mechanisms is presented. The dominant regions for specific mechanisms are compared and analyzed for effective testing. It is observed that for our SRAM example circuit only bias temperature instability (BTI) and middle-of-line time-dependent dielectric breakdown (MTDDB) have test regions where their failures can be isolated, while the other mechanisms can’t be extracted individually due to acceptable regions’ overlap. Meanwhile, the SRAM cell activity distribution has a small influence on test regions and selectivity. 
    more » « less
  2. Numerical simulations have revolutionized material design. However, although simulations excel at mapping an input material to its output property, their direct application to inverse design has traditionally been limited by their high computing cost and lack of differentiability. Here, taking the example of the inverse design of a porous matrix featuring targeted sorption isotherm, we introduce a computational inverse design framework that addresses these challenges, by programming differentiable simulation on TensorFlow platform that leverages automated end-to-end differentiation. Thanks to its differentiability, the simulation is used to directly train a deep generative model, which outputs an optimal porous matrix based on an arbitrary input sorption isotherm curve. Importantly, this inverse design pipeline leverages the power of tensor processing units (TPU)—an emerging family of dedicated chips, which, although they are specialized in deep learning, are flexible enough for intensive scientific simulations. This approach holds promise to accelerate inverse materials design. 
    more » « less