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Title: Symmetry controlled photo-selection and charge separation in butadiyne-bridged donor–bridge–acceptor compounds
Electron transfer (ET) in donor–bridge–acceptor (DBA) compounds depends strongly on the structural and electronic properties of the bridge. Among the bridges that support donor–acceptor conjugation, alkyne bridges have attractive and unique properties: they are compact, possess linear structure permitting access to high symmetry DBA molecules, and allow torsional motion of D and A, especially for longer bridges. We report conformation dependent electron transfer dynamics in a set of novel DBA compounds featuring butadiyne (C4) bridge, N -isopropyl-1,8-napthalimide (NAP) acceptors, and donors that span a range of reduction potentials (trimethyl silane (Si-C4-NAP), phenyl (Ph-C4-NAP), and dimethyl aniline (D-C4-NAP)). Transient mid-IR absorption spectra of the CC bridge stretching modes, transient spectra in the visible range, and TD-DFT calculations were used to decipher the ET mechanisms. We found that the electronic excited state energies and, especially, the transition dipoles (S 0 → S n ) depend strongly on the dihedral angle ( θ ) between D and A and the frontier orbital symmetry, offering an opportunity to photo-select particular excited states with specific ranges of dihedral angles by exciting at chosen wavelengths. For example, excitation of D-C4-NAP at 400 nm predominantly prepares an S 1 excited state in the planar conformations ( θ more » ∼ 0) but selects an S 2 state with θ ∼ 90°, indicating the dominant role of the molecular symmetry in the photophysics. Moreover, the symmetry of the frontier orbitals of such DBA compounds not only defines the photo-selection outcome, but also determines the rate of the S 2 → S 1 charge separation reaction. Unprecedented variation of the S 2 –S 1 electronic coupling with θ by over four orders of magnitude results in slow ET at θ ca. 0° and 90° but extremely fast ET at θ of 20–60°. The unique features of high-symmetry alkyne bridged DBA structures enable frequency dependent ET rate selection and make this family of compounds promising targets for the vibrational excitation control of ET kinetics. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1764347 1955138
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10156315
Journal Name:
Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics
Volume:
22
Issue:
17
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
9664 to 9676
ISSN:
1463-9076
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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