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Title: 1H, 13C, 15N resonance assignments and secondary structure of yeast oligosaccharyltransferase subunit Ost4 and its functionally important mutant Ost4V23D
Asparagine-linked glycosylation is an essential and highly conserved protein modification reaction that occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum of cells during protein synthesis at the ribosome. In the central reaction, a pre-assembled high- mannose sugar is transferred from a lipid-linked donor substrate to the side-chain of an asparagine residue in an -N-X-T/S- sequence (where X is any residue except Proline). This reaction is carried by a membrane-bound multi-subunit enzyme complex, Oligosaccharyltransferase (OST). In humans, genetic defects in OST lead to a group of rare metabolic diseases collectively known as congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG). Certain mutations are lethal for all organisms. In yeast, the OST is composed of nine non-identical protein subunits. The functional enzyme complex contains eight subunits with either Ost3 or Ost6 at any given time. Ost4, an unusually small protein, plays a very important role in the stabilization of the OST complex. It bridges the catalytic subunit Stt3 with Ost3 (or Ost6) in the Stt3-Ost4-Ost3 (or Ost6) sub-complex. Mutation of any residue from M18-I24 in the trans-membrane helix of yeast Ost4 negatively impacts N-linked glycosylation and the growth of yeast. Indeed, mutation of valine23 to an aspartate impairs OST function in vivo resulting in a lethal phenotype in yeast. To understand the structural mechanism of Ost4 in the stabilization of the enzyme complex, we have initiated a detailed investigation of Ost4 and its functionally important mutant, Ost4V23D. Here, we report the backbone 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments for Ost4 and Ost4V23D in DPC micelles.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1807722 1726397
NSF-PAR ID:
10159534
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Biomolecular NMR Assignments
ISSN:
1874-2718
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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