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Title: Ferromagnetism in 2D organic iron hemoglobin crystals based on nitrogenated conjugated micropore materials
In this work we study a low-cost two-dimensional ferromagnetic semiconductor with possible applications in biomedicine, solar cells, spintronics, and energy and hydrogen storage. From first principle calculations we describe the unique electronic, transport, optical, and magnetic properties of a π-conjugated micropore polymer (CMP) with three iron atoms placed in the middle of an isolated pore locally resembling heme complexes. This material exhibits strong Fe-localized d z2 bands. The bandgap is direct and equal to 0.28 eV. The valence band is doubly degenerate at the Γ -point and for larger k -wavevectors the HOMO band becomes flat with low contribution to charge mobility. The absorption coefficient is roughly isotropic. The conductivity is also isotropic with the nonzero contribution in the energy range 0.3–8 eV. The xy -component of the imaginary part of the dielectric tensor determines the magneto-optical Faraday and Kerr rotation. Nonvanishing rotation is observed in the interval of 0.5–5.0 eV. This material is found to be a ferromagnet of an Ising type with long-range exchange interactions with a very high magnetic moment per unit cell, m = 6 μ B . The exchange integral is calculated by two independent methods: (a) from the energy difference between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic more » states and (b) from a magnon dispersion curve. In the former case J nn = 27 μeV. In the latter case the magnon dispersion is fitted by the Ising model with the nearest and next-nearest neighbor spin interactions. From these estimations we find that J nn = 19.5 μeV and J nnn = −3 μeV. Despite the different nature of the calculations, the exchange integrals are only within 28% difference. « less
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1710512
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10162555
Journal Name:
Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics
Volume:
21
Issue:
46
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
25820 to 25825
ISSN:
1463-9076
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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