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Title: A phylogenetically novel cyanobacterium most closely related to Gloeobacter
Clues to the evolutionary steps producing innovations in oxygenic photosynthesis may be preserved in the genomes of organisms phylogenetically placed between non-photosynthetic Vampirovibrionia (formerly Melainabacteria) and the thylakoid-containing Cyanobacteria. However, only two species with published genomes are known to occupy this phylogenetic space, both within the genus Gloeobacter. Here, we describe nearly complete, metagenome-assembled genomes (MAGs) of an uncultured organism phylogenetically placed near Gloeobacter, for which we propose the name Candidatus Aurora vandensis {Au’ro.ra. L. fem. n. aurora, the goddess of the dawn in Roman mythology; van.de’nsis. N.L. fem. adj. vandensis of Lake Vanda, Antarctica}. The MAG of A. vandensis contains homologs of most genes necessary for oxygenic photosynthesis including key reaction center proteins. Many accessory subunits associated with the photosystems in other species either are missing from the MAG or are poorly conserved. The MAG also lacks homologs of genes associated with the pigments phycocyanoerethrin, phycoeretherin and several structural parts of the phycobilisome. Additional characterization of this organism is expected to inform models of the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1745341
NSF-PAR ID:
10163966
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
The ISME Journal
ISSN:
1751-7362
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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