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Title: Leveraging the Wisdom of Crowd to Address Societal Challenges: A Revisit to the Knowledge Reuse Process for Innovation through Analytics
Societal challenges can be addressed not only by experts, but also by crowds. Crowdsourcing provides a way to engage the general crowd to contribute to the solutions of the biggest challenges of our times: how to cut our carbon footprint, how to address worldwide epidemic of chronic disease, and how to achieve sustainable development. Isolated crowd-based solutions in online communities are not always creative and innovative. Hence, remixing has been developed as a way to enable idea evolution and integration, and to harness reusable innovative solutions. Understanding the generativity of remixing is essential to leveraging the wisdom of the crowd to solve societal challenges. At its best, remixing can promote online community engagement, as well as support comprehensive and innovative solution generation. Organizers can maintain an active online community; community members can collectively innovate and learn; and as a result, society may find new ways to solve important problems. What affects the generativity of a remix? We address this by revisiting the knowledge reuse process for innovation model. We analyze the reuse of proposals in an online innovation community which aims to address global climate change issues, Climate CoLab. We apply several analytical methods to study factors that may contribute more » to the generativity of a remix and uncover that remixes that include prevalent topics and integration metaknowledge are more generative. Our findings suggest strategies and tools that can help online communities to better harness collective intelligence for addressing societal challenges. « less
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1909803 1717473 1442840 1422066
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10171181
Journal Name:
Journal of the Association for Information Systems
ISSN:
1536-9323
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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  1. Remixing, a method to harness collective intelligence, is used in many online innovation communities. It is also an important form of online engagement. What actions lead to a remix that is generative? This paper addresses this question by using a knowledge reuse process model previously applied in offline settings as the basis for a series of hypotheses about online communities. An empirical study is performed to examine the relationship between three major actions in the knowledge reuse process model and the generativity of the remix created. An analysis of the reuse of proposals in an online innovation community, Climate CoLab, shows that those including prevalent topics and metaknowledge about integration are more generative. These findings provide insights to strategies and tools that can support knowledge reuse for innovation in online communities.
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