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Title: Electromagnetically induced transparency and lattice resonances in metasurfaces composed of silicon nanocylinders
Densely packed metasurfaces composed of cylindrical silicon nano-resonators were found to demonstrate the phenomenon of electromagnetically induced transparency at electric dipolar resonances. It was shown that this phenomenon is not related to overlapping of dipolar resonances or to the Kerker’s effects. The observed transparency appeared to be related to interference between waves scattered by nano-resonators and by additional scattering centers including the electric branch of lattice resonances. Coupled resonance fields were also found to contribute to observed phenomena.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1709991
NSF-PAR ID:
10173209
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
7th Advanced Electromagnetics Symposium, Lisbon, Portugal
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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