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Title: Peer Review in an Emerging Interdisciplinary Field: Identifying Differences in Authors’ Experiences and Perspectives
Engineering Education Research (EER) is an emerging interdisciplinary field (Beddoes, 2014a; Jesiek, Newswander, & Borrego, 2009). Having emerged less than twenty years ago, the field’s boundaries and normativities are still shifting and being formed. Furthermore, EER is inherently interdisciplinary, drawing on theories and methods from other fields, including education, psychology, and anthropology, among others (Beddoes, 2014b). These characteristics - the age and interdisciplinary nature of the field - make EER a particularly interesting site for examining a discipline in the making. One process through which the field’s boundaries and normativities are being formed is peer review (Beddoes, 2011). Therefore, the overarching goal of this project is to identify the kinds of scholarship that are readily accepted into the field and the kinds that are not. Examining this boundary work can produce new insights into the social construction of knowledge in EER, as well as in other interdisciplinary fields. As a first step toward the overarching goal, this paper presents preliminary findings that address the question: What differences exist in the experiences, perceptions, and understandings of those who have submitted articles to the Journal of Engineering Education (JEE) within the past 5 years?  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1929728
NSF-PAR ID:
10174296
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Hawaii International Conference on Education
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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