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Title: A Bayesian framework for inter-cellular information sharing improves dscRNA-seq quantification
Abstract Motivation Droplet-based single-cell RNA-seq (dscRNA-seq) data are being generated at an unprecedented pace, and the accurate estimation of gene-level abundances for each cell is a crucial first step in most dscRNA-seq analyses. When pre-processing the raw dscRNA-seq data to generate a count matrix, care must be taken to account for the potentially large number of multi-mapping locations per read. The sparsity of dscRNA-seq data, and the strong 3’ sampling bias, makes it difficult to disambiguate cases where there is no uniquely mapping read to any of the candidate target genes. Results We introduce a Bayesian framework for information sharing across cells within a sample, or across multiple modalities of data using the same sample, to improve gene quantification estimates for dscRNA-seq data. We use an anchor-based approach to connect cells with similar gene-expression patterns, and learn informative, empirical priors which we provide to alevin’s gene multi-mapping resolution algorithm. This improves the quantification estimates for genes with no uniquely mapping reads (i.e. when there is no unique intra-cellular information). We show our new model improves the per cell gene-level estimates and provides a principled framework for information sharing across multiple modalities. We test our method on a combination of simulated more » and real datasets under various setups. Availability and implementation The information sharing model is included in alevin and is implemented in C++14. It is available as open-source software, under GPL v3, at https://github.com/COMBINE-lab/salmon as of version 1.1.0. « less
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1763680 1750472 2029424
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10176993
Journal Name:
Bioinformatics
Volume:
36
Issue:
Supplement_1
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
i292 to i299
ISSN:
1367-4803
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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