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Title: Three New Freshwater Cochliopodium Species (Himatismenida, Amoebozoa) from the Southeastern United States
Cochliopodium is a lens-shaped genus of Amoebozoa characterized by a flexi- ble layer of microscopic dorsal scales. Recent taxonomic and molecular studies reported cryptic diversity in this group and suggested that the often-used scale morphology is not a reliable character for species delineation in the genus. Here, we described three freshwater Cochliopodium spp. from the southeast- ern United States based on morphological, immunocytochemistry (ICC), and molecular data. A maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analysis and pairwise com- parison of COI sequences of Cochliopodium species showed that each of these monoclonal cultures were genetically distinct from each other and any described species with molecular data. Two of the new isolates, “crystal UK- YT2” (Cochliopodium crystalli n. sp.) and “crystal-like UK-YT3” (C. jaguari n. sp.), formed a clade with C. larifeili, which all share a prominent microtubule organizing center (MTOC) and have cubical-shaped crystals. The “Marrs Spring UK-YT4” isolate, C. marrii n. sp., was 100% identical to “Cochliopodium sp. SG-2014 KJ569724.” These sequences formed a clade with C. actinophorum and C. arabianum. While the new isolates can be separated morphologically, most of the taxonomic features used in the group show plasticity; therefore, Cochliopodium species can only be reliably identified with the help of molecu- lar more » data. « less
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1831958
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10177104
Journal Name:
The journal of eukaryotic microbiology
ISSN:
1066-5234
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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