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Title: Optomechanical lasers for inertial sensing

We have developed an inertially sensitive optomechanical laser by combining a vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser (VECSEL) with a monolithic fused silica resonator. By placing the external cavity mirror of the VECSEL onto the optomechanical resonator test mass, we create a sensor where external accelerations are directly transcribed onto the lasing frequency. We developed a proof-of-principle laboratory prototype and observe test mass oscillations at the resonance frequency of the sensor through the VECSEL lasing frequency,4.18±<#comment/>0.03Hz. In addition, we set up an ancillary heterodyne interferometer to track the motion of the mechanical oscillator’s test mass, observing a resonance of4.194±<#comment/>0.004Hz. The interferometer measurements validate the VECSEL results, confirming the feasibility of using optomechanical lasers for inertial sensing.

 
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NSF-PAR ID:
10183062
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Optical Society of America
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of the Optical Society of America A
Volume:
37
Issue:
9
ISSN:
1084-7529; JOAOD6
Page Range / eLocation ID:
Article No. B87
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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