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Title: Role of Atmospheric Variability in Driving the “Warm‐Arctic, Cold‐Continent” Pattern Over the North America Sector and Sea Ice Variability Over the Chukchi‐Bering Sea
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1832842 1744598
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10183874
Journal Name:
Geophysical Research Letters
Volume:
47
Issue:
13
ISSN:
0094-8276
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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