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Title: Single-pass Cr:ZnSe amplifier for broadband infrared undulator radiation

An amplifier based on a highly-doped chromium zinc-selenide (Cr:ZnSe) crystal is proposed to increase the pulse energy emitted by an electron bunch after it passes through an undulator magnet. The primary motivation is a possible use of the amplified undulator radiation emitted by a beam circulating in a particle accelerator storage ring to increase the particle beam’s phase-space density—a technique dubbed optical stochastic cooling (OSC). This paper uses a simple four energy level model to estimate the single-pass gain of Cr:ZnSe and presents numerical calculations combined with wave-optics simulations of undulator radiation to estimate the expected properties of the amplified undulator wave-packet.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10186631
Journal Name:
Optics Express
Volume:
28
Issue:
18
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
Article No. 26601
ISSN:
1094-4087; OPEXFF
Publisher:
Optical Society of America
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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