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Title: Temperature-resilient solid-state organic artificial synapses for neuromorphic computing
Devices with tunable resistance are highly sought after for neuromorphic computing. Conventional resistive memories, however, suffer from nonlinear and asymmetric resistance tuning and excessive write noise, degrading artificial neural network (ANN) accelerator performance. Emerging electrochemical random-access memories (ECRAMs) display write linearity, which enables substantially faster ANN training by array programing in parallel. However, state-of-the-art ECRAMs have not yet demonstrated stable and efficient operation at temperatures required for packaged electronic devices (~90°C). Here, we show that (semi)conducting polymers combined with ion gel electrolyte films enable solid-state ECRAMs with stable and nearly temperature-independent operation up to 90°C. These ECRAMs show linear resistance tuning over a >2× dynamic range, 20-nanosecond switching, submicrosecond write-read cycling, low noise, and low-voltage (±1 volt) and low-energy (~80 femtojoules per write) operation combined with excellent endurance (>10 9 write-read operations at 90°C). Demonstration of these high-performance ECRAMs is a fundamental step toward their implementation in hardware ANNs.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1808401 1739795
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10188534
Journal Name:
Science Advances
Volume:
6
Issue:
27
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
eabb2958
ISSN:
2375-2548
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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