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Title: WMGCN: Weighted Meta-Graph Based Graph Convolutional Networks for Representation Learning in Heterogeneous Networks
Network embedding has been an effective tool to analyze heterogeneous networks (HNs) by representing nodes in a low-dimensional space. Although many recent methods have been proposed for representation learning of HNs, there is still much room for improvement. Random walks based methods are currently popular methods to learn network embedding; however, they are random and limited by the length of sampled walks, and have difculty capturing network structural information. Some recent researches proposed using meta paths to express the sample relationship in HNs. Another popular graph learning model, the graph convolutional network (GCN) is known to be capable of better exploitation of network topology, but the current design of GCN is intended for homogenous networks. This paper proposes a novel combination of meta-graph and graph convolution, the meta-graph based graph convolutional networks (MGCN). To fully capture the complex long semantic information, MGCN utilizes different meta-graphs in HNs. As different meta-graphs express different semantic relationships, MGCN learns the weights of different meta-graphs to make up for the loss of semantics when applying GCN. In addition, we improve the current convolution design by adding node self-signicance. To validate our model in learning feature representation, we present comprehensive experiments on four real-world datasets and more » two representation tasks: classication and link prediction. WMGCN's representations can improve accuracy scores by up to around 10% in comparison to other popular representation learning models. What's more, WMGCN'feature learning outperforms other popular baselines. The experimental results clearly show our model is superior over other state-of-the-art representation learning algorithms. « less
Authors:
Award ID(s):
1815256
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10189585
Journal Name:
IEEE access
Volume:
8
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
40744-40754
ISSN:
2169-3536
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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