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Title: Population genomics of divergence among extreme and intermediate color forms in a polymorphic insect
Abstract

Geographic variation in insect coloration is among the most intriguing examples of rapid phenotypic evolution and provides opportunities to study mechanisms of phenotypic change and diversification in closely related lineages. The bumble beeBombus bifariuscomprises two geographically disparate color groups characterized by red‐banded and black‐banded abdominal pigmentation, but with a range of spatially and phenotypically intermediate populations across western North America. Microsatellite analyses have revealed thatB. bifariusin the USA are structured into two major groups concordant with geography and color pattern, but also suggest ongoing gene flow among regional populations. In this study, we better resolve the relationships among major color groups to better understand evolutionary mechanisms promoting and maintaining such polymorphism. We analyze >90,000 and >25,000 single‐nucleotide polymorphisms derived from transcriptome (RNAseq) and double digest restriction site associatedDNAsequencing (ddRAD), respectively, in representative samples from spatial and color pattern extremes inB. bifariusas well as phenotypic and geographic intermediates. Both ddRADandRNAseq data illustrate substantial genome‐wide differentiation of the red‐banded (eastern) color form from both black‐banded (western) and intermediate (central) phenotypes and negligible differentiation among the latter populations, with no obvious admixture among bees from the two major lineages. Results thus indicate much stronger background differentiation amongB. bifariuslineages than expected, highlighting potential challenges for revealing loci underlying color polymorphism from population genetic data alone. These findings will have significance for resolving taxonomic confusion in this species and in future efforts to investigate color‐pattern evolution inB. bifariusand other polymorphic bumble bee species.

 
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Award ID(s):
1457659
NSF-PAR ID:
10196916
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Ecology and Evolution
Volume:
6
Issue:
4
ISSN:
2045-7758
Page Range / eLocation ID:
p. 1075-1091
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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