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Title: Distributed-feedback blue laser diode utilizing a tunnel junction grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

In this paper, we demonstrate a novel approach utilizing tunnel junction (TJ) to realize GaN-based distributed feedback (DFB) laser diodes (LDs). Thanks to the use of the TJ the top metal contact is moved to the side of the ridge and the DFB grating is placed directly on top of the ridge. The high refractive index contrast between air and GaN, together with the high overlap of optical mode with the grating, provides a high coupling coefficient. The demonstrated DFB LD operates at λ=450.15 nm with a side mode suppression ratio higher than 35dB. The results are compared to a standard Fabry-Perot LD.

Authors:
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Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10201070
Journal Name:
Optics Express
Volume:
28
Issue:
23
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
Article No. 35321
ISSN:
1094-4087; OPEXFF
Publisher:
Optical Society of America
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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