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Title: Increasing Evacuation During Disaster Events
Timely evacuation is a standard recommendation by local agencies before disaster events such as hurricanes, which have enough advance notice. However, it has been observed in many recent disasters (e.g., Sandy), that only a small fraction of the population evacuates in time. Recent work by social scientists has examined the factors that influence household evacuation decisions; in addition to individual factors it has been found that peer effect plays a role in this decision but in two opposing ways. Specifically, households are motivated to evacuate if their neighbors evacuate. However, if too many neighbors leave then some households have concerns of looting and crime, and they choose not to evacuate. This makes the dynamics of evacuation very complex. In this paper, we use a detailed agent based model to study the dynamics of evacuation in Virginia’s coastal region. We use data from a large survey and social contagion and collective action theories to develop the model. We evaluate different strategies to increase evacuation.
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1916670
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10204000
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the International Joint Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
654-662
ISSN:
1558-2914
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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