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Title: Restrained dendritic growth of adult-born granule cells innervated by transplanted fetal GABAergic interneurons in mice with temporal lobe epilepsy.
The dentate gyrus (DG) is a region of the adult rodent brain that undergoes continuous neurogenesis. Seizures and loss or dysfunction of GABAergic synapses onto adult-born dentate granule cells (GCs) alter their dendritic growth and migration, resulting in dysmorphic and hyperexcitable GCs. Additionally, transplants of fetal GABAergic interneurons in the DG of mice with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) result in seizure suppression, but it is unknown whether increasing interneurons with these transplants restores GABAergic innervation to adult-born GCs. Here we address this question by retroviral birth-dating GCs at different times up to 12 weeks after pilocarpine-induced TLE in adult mice. ChR2-EYFP-expressing MGE-derived GABAergic interneurons from E13.5 mouse embryos were transplanted into the DG of the TLE mice and GCs with transplant-derived inhibitory post-synaptic currents were identified by patch-clamp electrophysiology and optogenetic interrogation. Putative synaptic sites between GCs and GABAergic transplants were also confirmed by intracellular biocytin staining, immunohistochemistry, and confocal imaging. 3D reconstructions of dendritic arbors and quantitative morphometric analyses were carried out in >150 adult-born GCs. GABAergic inputs from transplanted interneurons correlated with markedly shorter GC dendrites, compared to GCs that were not innervated by the transplants. Moreover, these effects were confined to distal dendritic branches and a short more » time window of 6-8 weeks. The effects were independent of seizures as they were also observed in naïve mice with MGE transplants. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that increased inhibitory currents over a smaller dendritic arbor in adult-born GCs may reduce their excitability and lead to seizure suppression. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1828327
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10212767
Journal Name:
ENeuro
Volume:
6
Issue:
2
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
e3533
ISSN:
2373-2822
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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