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Title: How a Live Streamer's Choice in Played Game Affects Mental Health Conversations
As more viewers become interested in watching authentic personalities as opposed to artificial, crafted performances, Twitch streamers have begun to discuss personal issues such as mental health to form a closer bond with their community. This paper seeks to further explore how a live streamer's choice in game affects their viewers' perception of their stream's content. We interviewed 24 Twitch viewers and found that the pace of the game a streamer chooses to stream is a key factor in what viewers expect to see during the stream. These expectations at least partially determine whether viewers want to hear conversations about mental health.
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1841354
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10212774
Journal Name:
Extended Abstracts of the 2020 Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
297 - 300
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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