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Title: Exploiting Node Content for Multiview Graph Convolutional Network and Adversarial Regularization
Network representation learning (NRL) is crucial in the area of graph learning. Recently, graph autoencoders and its variants have gained much attention and popularity among various types of node embedding approaches. Most existing graph autoencoder-based methods aim to minimize the reconstruction errors of the input network while not explicitly considering the semantic relatedness between nodes. In this paper, we propose a novel network embedding method which models the consistency across different views of networks. More specifically, we create a second view from the input network which captures the relation between nodes based on node content and enforce the latent representations from the two views to be consistent by incorporating a multiview adversarial regularization module. The experimental studies on benchmark datasets prove the effectiveness of this method, and demonstrate that our method compares favorably with the state-of-the-art algorithms on challenging tasks such as link prediction and node clustering. We also evaluate our method on a real-world application, i.e., 30-day unplanned ICU readmission prediction, and achieve promising results compared with several baseline methods.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1747798
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10213961
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the 28th International Conference on Computational Linguistics
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
545 to 555
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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