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Title: An integrated peach genome structural variation map uncovers genes associated with fruit traits
Abstract Background Genome structural variations (SVs) have been associated with key traits in a wide range of agronomically important species; however, SV profiles of peach and their functional impacts remain largely unexplored. Results Here, we present an integrated map of 202,273 SVs from 336 peach genomes. A substantial number of SVs have been selected during peach domestication and improvement, which together affect 2268 genes. Genome-wide association studies of 26 agronomic traits using these SVs identify a number of candidate causal variants. A 9-bp insertion in Prupe.4G186800 , which encodes a NAC transcription factor, is shown to be associated with early fruit maturity, and a 487-bp deletion in the promoter of PpMYB10.1 is associated with flesh color around the stone. In addition, a 1.67 Mb inversion is highly associated with fruit shape, and a gene adjacent to the inversion breakpoint, PpOFP1 , regulates flat shape formation. Conclusions The integrated peach SV map and the identified candidate genes and variants represent valuable resources for future genomic research and breeding in peach.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1855585
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10215594
Journal Name:
Genome Biology
Volume:
21
Issue:
1
ISSN:
1474-760X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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