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Title: Growth in STEM Teachers’ Formative Assessment Practices as Teachers Remain in High-Need Districts
The way teachers design activities and interact with students during instruction directly impacts students' opportunities to learn (OTL). Previous research has shown the merits of formative assessment (FA) in supporting students' active sense-making, leading to improved student success outcomes. We examined 22 STEM teachers' classroom videos, performing FA in class, taken from two different years of teaching in high-need districts. We then coded the videos according to two basic teaching moves - eliciting information about students' thinking or advanced learning. These moves can also be categorized as more authoritative (univocal) class discourse or more dialogic (multivocal). Our results show that thirteen out of the twenty-two teachers in this study diversified their teaching moves over time as they gained experience while persisting in high-need districts. The results also suggest five different teachers' clusters, representing different changes over time in these teachers' teaching moves. Teachers' reflections on challenges they faced while teaching and changes in their assessment practices over time suggest that changes in their teaching purposes resulted in shifting their teaching moves. These shifts supported their students' different challenges, building meaningful relationships with their students, and allowing them more OTL.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1757249
NSF-PAR ID:
10216162
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
NARST 94th Annual International Conference
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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