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Title: MomentumRNN: Integrating Momentum into Recurrent Neural Networks
Designing deep neural networks is an art that often involves an expensive search over candidate architectures. To overcome this for recurrent neural nets (RNNs), we establish a connection between the hidden state dynamics in an RNN and gradient descent (GD). We then integrate momentum into this framework and propose a new family of RNNs, called MomentumRNNs. We theoretically prove and numerically demonstrate that MomentumRNNs alleviate the vanishing gradient issue in training RNNs. We study the momentum long-short term memory (MomentumLSTM) and verify its advantages in convergence speed and accuracy over its LSTM counterpart across a variety of benchmarks. We also demonstrate that MomentumRNN is applicable to many types of recurrent cells, including those in the state-of-the-art orthogonal RNNs. Finally, we show that other advanced momentum-based optimization methods, such as Adam and Nesterov accelerated gradients with a restart, can be easily incorporated into the MomentumRNN framework for designing new recurrent cells with even better performance.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1952339
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10220549
Journal Name:
34th Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NeurIPS 2020), Vancouver, Canada
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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