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Title: New germanate and mixed cobalt germanate salt inclusion materials: [(Rb 6 F)(Rb 4 F)][Ge 14 O 32 ] and [(Rb 6 F)(Rb 3.1 Co 0.9 F 0.96 )][Co 3.8 Ge 10.2 O 30 F 2 ]
Single crystals of two new germanates, [(Rb 6 F)(Rb 4 F)][Ge 14 O 32 ] and [(Rb 6 F)(Rb 3.1 Co 0.9 F 0.96 )][Co 3.8 Ge 10.2 O 30 F 2 ], were synthesized via high temperature RbCl/RbF flux growth. Both compounds crystallize in the cubic space group F 4̄3 m and possess the germanium framework of the previously reported salt inclusion material (SIM), [(Cs 6 F)(Cs 3 AgF)][Ge 14 O 32 ], related to the Ge 7 O 16 zeolitic family. These materials demonstrate the ability to accommodate a variety of salt-inclusions, and exhibit chemical flexibility enabling modifications of the framework through incorporation of Co. Alteration of the salt-inclusion led to intrinsic luminescence of [(Rb 6 F)(Rb 4 F)][Ge 14 O 32 ] while modification of the framework resulted in an unanticipated Rb/Co salt/inclusion in [(Rb 6 F)(Rb 3.1 Co 0.9 F 0.96 )][Co 3.8 Ge 10.2 O 30 F 2 ]. Fluorescence measurements were performed on [(Rb 6 F)(Rb 4 F)][Ge 14 O 32 ]. First-principles calculations in the form of density functional theory (DFT) were performed for [(Rb 6 F)(Rb 3.1 Co 0.9 F 0.96 )][Co 3.8 Ge 10.2 O 30 F 2 ] to elucidate more » its electronic and magnetic properties, and stability at 0 K. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1806279
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10221560
Journal Name:
CrystEngComm
Volume:
22
Issue:
46
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
8072 to 8080
ISSN:
1466-8033
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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