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Title: Do Different Groups Have Comparable Privacy Tradeoffs?
Personalized systems increasingly employ Privacy Enhancing Technologies (PETs) to protect the identity of their users. In this paper, we are interested in whether the cost-benefit tradeoff — the underlying economics of the privacy calculus — is fairly distributed, or whether some groups of people experience a lower return on investment for their privacy decisions.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1657774
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10222636
Journal Name:
CHI 2018 Workshop on Moving Beyond a ‘One-Size Fits All’
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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