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Title: Unexpected circular radio objects at high Galactic latitude
Abstract We have found a class of circular radio objects in the Evolutionary Map of the Universe Pilot Survey, using the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder telescope. The objects appear in radio images as circular edge-brightened discs, about one arcmin diameter, that are unlike other objects previously reported in the literature. We explore several possible mechanisms that might cause these objects, but none seems to be a compelling explanation.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1714205
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10228484
Journal Name:
Publications of the Astronomical Society of Australia
Volume:
38
ISSN:
1323-3580
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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