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Title: Ocean-excited plate waves in the Ross and Pine Island Glacier ice shelves
Abstract Ice shelves play an important role in buttressing land ice from reaching the sea, thus restraining the rate of grounded ice loss. Long-period gravity-wave impacts excite vibrations in ice shelves that can expand pre-existing fractures and trigger iceberg calving. To investigate the spatial amplitude variability and propagation characteristics of these vibrations, a 34-station broadband seismic array was deployed on the Ross Ice Shelf (RIS) from November 2014 to November 2016. Two types of ice-shelf plate waves were identified with beamforming: flexural-gravity waves and extensional Lamb waves. Below 20 mHz, flexural-gravity waves dominate coherent signals across the array and propagate landward from the ice front at close to shallow-water gravity-wave speeds (~70 m s −1 ). In the 20–100 mHz band, extensional Lamb waves dominate and propagate at phase speeds ~3 km s −1 . Flexural-gravity and extensional Lamb waves were also observed by a 5-station broadband seismic array deployed on the Pine Island Glacier (PIG) ice shelf from January 2012 to December 2013, with flexural wave energy, also detected at the PIG in the 20–100 mHz band. Considering the ubiquitous presence of storm activity in the Southern Ocean and the similar observations at both the RIS and the PIG more » ice shelves, it is likely that most, if not all, West Antarctic ice shelves are subjected to similar gravity-wave excitation. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1246151
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10231433
Journal Name:
Journal of Glaciology
Volume:
64
Issue:
247
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
730 to 744
ISSN:
0022-1430
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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