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Title: Insights into Intragroup Variation in Precontact Paleodiet: A Middle Period Example from San Mateo County
This article reports new carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur isotope data for 10 individuals on the San Francisco Peninsula from CA-SMA-78 (Hamilton Mound 20; n = 6), CA-SMA-160 (Hiller Mound; n = 3), and a previously unrecorded site in downtown San Mateo (n = 1). We also report seven new bone collagen accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dates, three from CA-SMA-78 that fall during the Early-Middle Transition and early Middle Period (ca. 2,400 and 1,700 cal BP), three from CA-SMA-160 that fall during the late Middle and Middle-Late Transition periods (ca. 1,080 and 770 cal BP), and one from the unrecorded site that falls during the Late Middle Period (ca. 1,260 cal BP). Dietary isotopes show a bimodal pattern, with most individuals (n = 8) consuming a mixed marine-terrestrial diet and two a terrestrial-dominant diet (n = 2). We propose two hypotheses to explain this variation, the first suggesting independent family-level hunting and gathering territories combined with little intra-group sharing of food, and the second suggesting exogamous marriage patterns with people migrating from regions to the south. Future isotopic research could provide support for one (or both) of these hypotheses.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2021256
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10232364
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the Society for California Archaeology
Volume:
34
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1-14
ISSN:
0897-0947
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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