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Title: Tool trouble: Challenges with using self‐report data to evaluate long‐term chemistry teacher professional development
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NSF-PAR ID:
10240028
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of Research in Science Teaching
Volume:
53
Issue:
7
ISSN:
0022-4308
Format(s):
Medium: X Size: p. 1055-1081
Size(s):
["p. 1055-1081"]
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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