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Title: Microbiome Analysis Reveals Diversity and Function of Mollicutes Associated with the Eastern Oyster, Crassostrea virginica
Marine invertebrate microbiomes play important roles in diverse host and ecological processes. However, a mechanistic understanding of host-microbe interactions is currently available for a small number of model organisms. Here, an integrated taxonomic and functional analysis of the microbiome of the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, was performed using 16S rRNA gene-based amplicon profiling, shotgun metagenomics, and genome-scale metabolic reconstruction. Relatively high variability of the microbiome was observed across individual oysters and among different tissue types. Specifically, a significantly higher alpha diversity was observed in the inner shell than in the gut, gill, mantle, and pallial fluid samples, and a distinct microbiome composition was revealed in the gut compared to other tissues examined in this study. Targeted metagenomic sequencing of the gut microbiota led to further characterization of a dominant bacterial taxon, the class Mollicutes, which was captured by the reconstruction of a metagenome-assembled genome (MAG). Genome-scale metabolic reconstruction of the oyster Mollicutes MAG revealed a reduced set of metabolic functions and a high reliance on the uptake of host-derived nutrients. A chitin degradation and an arginine deiminase pathway were unique to the MAG compared to closely related genomes of Mollicutes isolates, indicating distinct mechanisms of carbon and energy acquisition by more » the oyster-associated Mollicutes. A systematic reanalysis of public eastern oyster-derived microbiome data revealed a high prevalence of the Mollicutes among adult oyster guts and a significantly lower relative abundance of the Mollicutes in oyster larvae and adult oyster biodeposits. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Editors:
Campbell, Barbara J.
Award ID(s):
1655221 1929078 1553211
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10248741
Journal Name:
mSphere
ISSN:
2379-5042
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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