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Title: “As Long As We Have the Mine, We'll Have Water”: Exploring Water Insecurity in Appalachia
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1759972
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10274759
Journal Name:
Annals of Anthropological Practice
Volume:
44
Issue:
1
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
65 to 76
ISSN:
2153-957X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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