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Title: Designing Chatbots as Community-Owned Agents
This work investigates how social agents can be designed to create a sense of ownership over them within a group of users. Social agents, such as conversational agents and chatbots, currently interact with people in impersonal, isolated, and often one-on-one interactions: one user and one agent. This is likely to change as agents become more socially sophisticated and integrated in social fabrics. Previous research has indicated that understanding who owns an agent can assist in creating expectations and understanding who an agent is accountable to within a group. We present findings from a three week case-study in which we implemented a chatbot that was successful in creating a sense of collective ownership within a community. We discuss the design choices that led to this outcome and implications for social agent design.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1734456
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10275596
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the 2nd Conference on Conversational User Interfaces
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1 to 3
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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