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Title: Stimulated Emission with Evanescent Gain in the Total Internal Reflection Geometry
We demonstrated amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) enabled by evanescent gain at an interface between two adjacent dielectrics. The ASE wave is outcoupled to the high-index medium at the critical angle, enabling observation of spectacular emission rings.
Authors:
Award ID(s):
1856515
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10276491
Journal Name:
CLEO Conference (virtual), May 9 – May 14, 2021, paper JW1A.128
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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