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Title: Learning to Teach: How a Simulated Learning Environment Can Connect Theory to Practice in General and Special Education Educator Preparation Programs
Abstract: Educator preparation programs have moved away from o ering interest-based courses that prepare a teacher candidate on a more surface level and have opted to integrate more authentic experiences with technology that are infused into coursework. This research study focused on redesigning key courses in both the general and special education graduate-level educator preparation programs (EPPs) to infuse learning experiences through a simulated learning environment (Mursion) to help bridge teacher candidates’ coursework and field experiences, o ering them robust experience with high leverage practices and technology that increases their own competency. Data from this study demonstrated that preservice teacher candidate work within the Mursion simulated learning environment increased use of high leverage practices related to strategic teaching, collaboration, differentiation, and providing feedback. Implications for instructional coaching, microteaching, repeated practice, and closing the research to practice gap are discussed.
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1817519
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10279578
Journal Name:
Education sciences
Volume:
10
Issue:
7
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
184
ISSN:
2227-7102
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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