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Title: Drivers of within-host genetic diversity in acute infections of viruses
Genetic diversity is the fuel of evolution and facilitates adaptation to novel environments. However, our understanding of what drives differences in the genetic diversity during the early stages of viral infection is somewhat limited. Here, we use ultra-deep sequencing to interrogate 43 clinical samples taken from early infections of the human-infecting viruses HIV, RSV and CMV. Hundreds to thousands of virus templates were sequenced per sample, allowing us to reveal dramatic differences in within-host genetic diversity among virus populations. We found that increased diversity was mostly driven by presence of multiple divergent genotypes in HIV and CMV samples, which we suggest reflect multiple transmitted/founder viruses. Conversely, we detected an abundance of low frequency hyper-edited genomes in RSV samples, presumably reflecting defective virus genomes (DVGs). We suggest that RSV is characterized by higher levels of cellular co-infection, which allow for complementation and hence elevated levels of DVGs.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Editors:
Lowen, Anice C.
Award ID(s):
1655212
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10283633
Journal Name:
PLOS Pathogens
Volume:
16
Issue:
11
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
e1009029
ISSN:
1553-7374
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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