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Title: A demonstration of improved constraints on primordial gravitational waves with delensing
BICEP Keck Collaboration; SPTpol Collaboration;
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1639040 1726917
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10284328
Journal Name:
Physical review
Volume:
103
Issue:
2
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
2004-26
ISSN:
1550-7998
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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