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Title: A single mode of population covariation associates brain networks structure and behavior and predicts individual subjects’ age
Abstract

Multiple human behaviors improve early in life, peaking in young adulthood, and declining thereafter. Several properties of brain structure and function progress similarly across the lifespan. Cognitive and neuroscience research has approached aging primarily using associations between a few behaviors, brain functions, and structures. Because of this, the multivariate, global factors relating brain and behavior across the lifespan are not well understood. We investigated the global patterns of associations between 334 behavioral and clinical measures and 376 brain structural connections in 594 individuals across the lifespan. A single-axis associated changes in multiple behavioral domains and brain structural connections (r = 0.5808). Individual variability within the single association axis well predicted the age of the subject (r = 0.6275). Representational similarity analysis evidenced global patterns of interactions across multiple brain network systems and behavioral domains. Results show that global processes of human aging can be well captured by a multivariate data fusion approach.

Authors:
;
Award ID(s):
2203524 2148729 1912270 1734853 1636893
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10284367
Journal Name:
Communications Biology
Volume:
4
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2399-3642
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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