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Title: Global Population Exposed to Extreme Events in the 150 Most Populated Cities of the World: Implications for Public Health
Climate change driven increases in the frequency of extreme heat events (EHE) and extreme precipitation events (EPE) are contributing to both infectious and non-infectious disease burden, particularly in urban city centers. While the share of urban populations continues to grow, a comprehensive assessment of populations impacted by these threats is lacking. Using data from weather stations, climate models, and urban population growth during 1980–2017, here, we show that the concurrent rise in the frequency of EHE, EPE, and urban populations has resulted in over 500% increases in individuals exposed to EHE and EPE in the 150 most populated cities of the world. Since most of the population increases over the next several decades are projected to take place in city centers within low- and middle-income countries, skillful early warnings and community specific response strategies are urgently needed to minimize public health impacts and associated costs to the global economy.
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2025470
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10284777
Journal Name:
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume:
18
Issue:
3
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1293
ISSN:
1660-4601
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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