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Title: Off-axis jet scenario for early afterglow emission of low-luminosity gamma-ray burst GRB 190829A
ABSTRACT Recently, ground-based Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes have reported the detection of very-high-energy (VHE) gamma-rays from some gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). One of them, GRB 190829A, was triggered by the Swift satellite, and about 2 × 104 s after the burst onset the VHE gamma-ray emission was detected by H.E.S.S. with ∼5σ significance. This event had unusual features of having much smaller isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy than typical long GRBs and achromatic peaks in X-ray and optical afterglow at about 1.4 × 103 s. Here, we propose an off-axis jet scenario that explains these observational results. In this model, the relativistic beaming effect is responsible for the apparently small isotropic gamma-ray energy and spectral peak energy. Using a jetted afterglow model, we find that the narrow jet, which has the initial Lorentz factor of 350 and the initial jet opening half-angle of 0.015 rad, viewed off-axis can describe the observed achromatic behaviour in the X-ray and optical afterglow. Another wide, baryon-loaded jet is necessary for the later-epoch X-ray and radio emissions. According to our model, the VHE gamma rays observed by H.E.S.S. at 2 × 104 s may come from the narrow jet through the synchrotron self-Compton process.
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1908689
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10291142
Journal Name:
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Volume:
504
Issue:
4
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
5647 to 5655
ISSN:
0035-8711
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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