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Title: The Impact of 5‐Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF)‐Metal Interactions on the Electrochemical Reduction Pathways of HMF on Various Metal Electrodes
Authors:
 ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10292031
Journal Name:
ChemSusChem
Volume:
14
Issue:
20
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
p. 4563-4572
ISSN:
1864-5631
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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