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Title: LiSBOA (LiDAR Statistical Barnes Objective Analysis) for optimal design of lidar scans and retrieval of wind statistics – Part 1: Theoretical framework
A LiDAR Statistical Barnes Objective Analysis (LiSBOA) for the optimal design of lidar scans and retrieval of the velocity statistical moments is proposed. LiSBOA represents an adaptation of the classical Barnes scheme for the statistical analysis of unstructured experimental data in N-dimensional space, and it is a suitable technique for the evaluation over a structured Cartesian grid of the statistics of scalar fields sampled through scanning lidars. LiSBOA is validated and characterized via a Monte Carlo approach applied to a synthetic velocity field. This revisited theoretical framework for the Barnes objective analysis enables the formulation of guidelines for the optimal design of lidar experiments and efficient application of LiSBOA for the postprocessing of lidar measurements. The optimal design of lidar scans is formulated as a two-cost-function optimization problem, including the minimization of the percentage of the measurement volume not sampled with adequate spatial resolution and the minimization of the error on the mean of the velocity field. The optimal design of the lidar scans also guides the selection of the smoothing parameter and the total number of iterations to use for the Barnes scheme. LiSBOA is assessed against a numerical data set generated using the virtual lidar technique applied to more » the data obtained from a large eddy simulation (LES). The optimal sampling parameters for a scanning Doppler pulsed wind lidar are retrieved through LiSBOA, and then the estimated statistics are compared with those of the original LES data set, showing a maximum error of about 4 % for both mean velocity and turbulence intensity. « less
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1705837
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10292424
Journal Name:
Atmospheric measurement techniques
Volume:
14
Issue:
3
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
2065-2093
ISSN:
1867-1381
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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