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Title: Chromosome-level genome assembly of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus
The blue crab, Callinectes sapidus (Rathbun, 1896) is an economically, culturally, and ecologically important species found across the temperate and tropical North and South American Atlantic coast. A reference genome will enable research for this high-value species. Initial assembly combined 200× coverage Illumina paired-end reads, a 60× 8 kb mate-paired library, and 50× PacBio data using the MaSuRCA assembler resulting in a 985 Mb assembly with a scaffold N50 of 153 kb. Dovetail Chicago and HiC sequencing with the 3d DNA assembler and Juicebox assembly tools were then used for chromosome scaffolding. The 50 largest scaffolds span 810 Mb are 1.5–37 Mb long and have a repeat content of 36%. The 190 Mb unplaced sequence is in 3921 sequences over 10 kb with a repeat content of 68%. The final assembly N50 is 18.9 Mb for scaffolds and 9317 bases for contigs. Of arthropod BUSCO, ∼88% (888/1013) were complete and single copies. Using 309 million RNAseq read pairs from 12 different tissues and developmental stages, 25,249 protein-coding genes were predicted. Between C. sapidus and Portunus trituberculatus genomes, 41 of 50 large scaffolds had high nucleotide identity and protein-coding synteny, but 9 scaffolds in both assemblies were not clear matches. The protein-coding genes included 9423 one-to-one putative orthologs, of which 7165 were syntenic between the two crab species. Overall, the two crab genome assemblies show strong similarities at the nucleotide, protein, and chromosome level and verify the blue crab genome as an excellent reference for this important seafood species.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1658466
NSF-PAR ID:
10293971
Author(s) / Creator(s):
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Genes genomes genomics
Volume:
9
Issue:
11
ISSN:
1749-0383
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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