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Title: DeepSZ: Identification of Sunyaev-Zel’dovich galaxy clusters using deep learning
Abstract Galaxy clusters identified via the Sunyaev-Zel’dovich effect (SZ) are a key ingredient in multi-wavelength cluster cosmology. We present and compare three methods of cluster identification: the standard Matched Filter (MF) method in SZ cluster finding, a Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN), and a ‘combined’ identifier. We apply the methods to simulated millimeter maps for several observing frequencies for a survey similar to SPT-3G, the third-generation camera for the South Pole Telescope. The MF requires image pre-processing to remove point sources and a model for the noise, while the CNN requires very little pre-processing of images. Additionally, the CNN requires tuning of hyperparameters in the model and takes cutout images of the sky as input, identifying the cutout as cluster-containing or not. We compare differences in purity and completeness. The MF signal-to-noise ratio depends on both mass and redshift. Our CNN, trained for a given mass threshold, captures a different set of clusters than the MF, some with SNR below the MF detection threshold. However, the CNN tends to mis-classify cutouts whose clusters are located near the edge of the cutout, which can be mitigated with staggered cutouts. We leverage the complementarity of the two methods, combining the scores from each more » method for identification. The purity and completeness are both 0.61 for MF, and 0.59 and 0.61 for CNN. The combined method yields 0.60 and 0.77, a significant increase for completeness with a modest decrease in purity. We advocate for combined methods that increase the confidence of many low signal-to-noise clusters. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2009944 2009121
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10294311
Journal Name:
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
ISSN:
0035-8711
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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